Emblems of Britain

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EMBLEMS OF BRITAIN
Each country in Britain has its symbols:


NATIONAL FLAGS

England
St. George's CrossФайл:Flag1 RyzhyyU.I.21.04.2012.gif

The national flag of England, known as St. George's Cross, has been England's national flag since the 13th century. Originally the flag was used by the maritime state the Republic of Genoa. The English monarch paid a tribute to the Doge of Genoa from 1190 onwards, so that English ships could fly the flag as a means of protection when entering the Mediterranean. A red cross acted as a symbol for many Crusaders in the 12th and 13th centuries. It became associated with Saint George, along with countries and cities, which claimed him as their patron saint and used his cross as a banner.Since 1606 the St George's Cross has formed part of the design of the Union Flag, a Pan-British flag designed by King James I.

Scotland
Flag Scotland RyzhyyU.I.21.04.2012.jpg

The Flag of Scotland,also known as Saint Andrew's Cross or the Saltire, is the national flag of Scotland. As the national flag it is the Saltire, rather than the Royal Standard of Scotland, which is the correct flag for all individuals and corporate bodies to fly in order to demonstrate both their loyalty and Scottish nationality. It is also, where possible, flown from Scottish Government buildings every day from 8am until sunset, with certain exceptions. According to legend, the Christian apostle and martyr Saint Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland, was crucified on an X-shaped cross at Patras, (Patrae), in Achaea. Use of the familiar iconography of his martyrdom, showing the apostle bound to an X-shaped cross, first appears in the Kingdom of Scotland in 1180 during the reign of William I. This image was again depicted on seals used during the late 13th century; including on one particular example used by the Guardians of Scotland, dated 1286.[7]

FLORAL EMBLEMS

Emblem rose Ryzhyy Uriy09.03.2012.jpg


England - St. George and the Rose The national flower of England is the rose. The flower has been adopted as England’s emblem since the time of the Wars of the Roses - civil wars (1455-1485) between the royal house of Lancaster (whose emblem was a red rose) and the royal house of York (whose emblem was a white rose).




Emblem thistle Ryzhyy Uriy09.03.2012.jpg
Scotland - St. Andrew - the Thistle and Scottish Bluebell
The national flower of Scotland is the thistle, a prickly-leaved purple flower which was first used in the 15th century as a symbol of defence. The Scottish Bluebell is also seen as the flower of Scotland.




Emblem daffodil Ryzhyy Uriy09.03.2012.jpg
Wales - St. David and the Daffodil The national flower of Wales is the daffodil , which is traditionally worn on St. David’s Day. The vegetable called leek is also considered to be a traditional emblem of Wales.

There are many explanations of how the leek came to be adopted as the national emblem of Wales. One is that St David advised the Welsh, on the eve of battle with the Saxons, to wear leeks in their caps to distinguish friend from foe. As Shakespeare records in Henry V, the Welsh archers wore leeks at the battle of Agincourt in 1415.



Emblem rose Ryzhyy Uriy09.03.2012.jpg
Northern Ireland - St. Patrick and the Shamrock
The national flower of Northern Ireland is the shamrock,a three-leaved plant similar to clover. An Irish tale tells of how Patrick used the three-leafed shamrock to explain the Trinity. He used it in his sermons to represent how the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit could all exist as separate elements of the same entity. His followers adopted the custom of wearing a shamrock on his feast day.






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British life and culture








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